Bushfires, floods and drought and how Animal Communication can help

As a dual national of the UK and Australia, I am struck by the extreme weather conditions being experienced on both sides of the planet right now.  Listening to the rain drumming on my roof I wonder whether it will ever stop raining.  Our fields are so water-logged that the animals are getting bogged, and we have not been able to get out there other than on foot for weeks now.  However this is simply an inconvenience as luckily our farm is (mostly) elevated, meanwhile our neighbours in Kent are being flooded out of their homes.  Floods have hit Cornwall and Middlesborough too, and across the UK there are 80 flood warnings in place for the Christmas holiday period.

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At the same time, my friends on the other side of the world are praying for rain.  The unprecedented level of bush fires now raging across the whole of Australia are not helped by the tinder-dry landscape – the drought is so extreme that some areas have not seen rain for ten years.  People are giving away their horses and farmers are shooting their livestock because they have no food or water for them.  It is heart-breaking.

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Whether we are dealing with rain, fire, flood or drought, the animals are suffering alongside us.  We have seen heartbreaking images of animals doggie-paddling through floodwaters desperately seeking dry land, of koalas burned or suffering from smoke inhalation. Then there are all those creatures who don’t make the news – birds, insects, reptiles, small mammals – as well as the plants and trees; all struggling to survive these extreme conditions.


This is a vital time.  There is much we can do as animal communicators to help alleviate the suffering, providing support and reassurance to those animals being affected by these extreme conditions.  Whether or not we can physically be with them, telepathic animal communication allows us to help them anyway.  Here are some ways in which we can help:

  1. PREPARE THEM BEFOREHAND:

BadgerAlert wild animals to an approaching weather event, letting them know (in the case of fire) which direction to travel in order to escape without running towards another fire.  Let burrowing animals (such as badger, fox, rabbit) that live in low lying areas know that floods are on their way so that they can relocate to an elevated site.

Let domesticated animals know that they need to be relocated due to impending fire or flood, explaining what is happening and where they will be taken.  This helps them to prepare and also not to be fearful because now they understand what is happening and why.  We can also let them know how long they need to be relocated for.  Is this temporary until danger is out of the way, or permanent because their home is gone?

2. HELP THEM AFTERWARDS:

KoalaFind out how they are coping.  If they have been injured, ask them about the extent of the injury and whether it is causing them pain.  Ask them if they know what could help to alleviate the pain or to help them heal.

Let them know what will happen to them now.  Explain what the humans are considering, and ask them if they are happy with that.  Especially in the case of rehoming animals (wild or domesticated).  We can ask them if they would like to go here or there, assuming that there are choices available.  If there is no choice, tell them as it helps them to more easily relax into the only option that is available to them.

If they need to be rehomed for a while, tell them how long it will be and reassure them that they will return home after that period of time has elapsed.  If plans change while they are in the relocated place, let them know as soon as possible that there has been a change of plan and give them the new information.

Our work here is to help them to understand the changes that will happen, to help them understand the reasons behind those changes, and to keep them updated, so they are able to roll with these changes as they occur.  Just like people, the more information they have and the better prepared they are, the more easily they can adjust to the new, unfamiliar situation.

3. SUPPORT THEM DURING REHABILITATION:

Wild horseKeep checking in with them to see how they are getting on.  Is their injury healing?  Is there anything else they need to be comfortable or out of pain?

How are they settling in to their new home?  Remember that animals live very much in the present moment. As long as they have been given good information about why they are there and for how long, they will quite quickly adjust to their new situation.  However it is good to check in with them from time to time, making sure that all is well and asking if there is anything else they need.

Give them news of their people (if they have had to be separated from them).  They will be curious and will want to know that their humans are OK.  This is especially important if their humans are unable to visit them regularly or at all.

4. HOSPICE THEM AT THE END OF LIFE:

BirdWhen an animal is facing the end of its physical life, we can provide essential support to them at this time.  Whether we are encountering wild animals that have been fatally injured by inhaling smoke or water, or have been burnt or drowned, we can hospice them on their way back to spirit realm.

Simply bearing witness and sending them feelings of love and appreciation, letting them know that our thoughts are with them and that we care about what happens to them, can make a big difference to the animal’s transition.  [This is a witnessing process, also known as Subtle Activism, and there are other ways that Subtle Activism can help which I mention in the fifth point.]

If an animal has been identified by a human (vet or other) that it has reached the end of its ability to survive, there is a decision to be made about how that animal transitions.  We can act as a go-between, asking the animal how it would like to transition.  Some animals want to go quickly and are happy to be euthanised.  Some are very clear about where and when they would like to be euthanised, and others clearly do not want to be euthanised, preferring to let nature take its course.

We can play a key role at these times, enabling the animal’s wishes to be taken into account and relaying those to the humans involved.  However, this is also a time to tread carefully and mindfully as not all humans are ready to consider that their animal has wishes which may sometimes conflict with their own.  Especially when humans are already dealing with their own trauma and grief around the situation, it can be hard for them to encompass new perspectives.  It is important that we are respectful of where each person is at on their own journey of relationship with the animal realm, and that we do not force our own ideas upon them.  At these times I find great comfort in Penelope Smith’s Code of Ethics for Interspecies Communicators:

“We go only where we are asked to help, so that others are receptive and we truly can help. We respect the feelings and ideas of others and work for interspecies understanding, not pitting one side against another but walking with compassion for all. We acknowledge the things that we cannot change and continue where our work can be most effective.”

5. SUBTLE ACTIVISM:

The world of Subtle Activism is one that is gaining a stronger foothold, and which can be immensely supportive for the animals as well as for us humans.  Especially in those situations where we cannot be physically present and cannot do anything at a practical level, we can feel overwhelmingly powerless.  With Subtle Activism at our disposal we are never powerless.

Subtle Activism is simply holding positive thoughts and feelings and sending those to the situation or animal or person who is struggling. It might be in the form of words – “I see you, I care about what is happening to you, I am sending you love, care and support”.  It could be in the form of feelings of love and compassion.  Or it could be a blend of both.

Bushfire-landscape.jpgIn the situations I have been describing here, we can send these thoughts and feelings to specific animals (wild or domestic) that we know about, or we can send them (using our intention) to all animals in a particular area.  In the latter case, we don’t need to know exactly who is there, we just trust that whoever is there will pick up these energetic vibrations and that they will feel supported and strengthened by them.


I hope that this post has given you some inspiration and ideas for how to bring these precious skills into practical application to support the animals during these challenging times.  It is my hope that we can all work together to help alleviate pain and reduce the suffering of animals and humans alike.

All of my workshops in 2020 will include a greater focus on how we can work with nature and animals in this way; providing you with tools and empowering you to make a positive difference in these times.  The Level Two workshops will include a deeper exploration of working with the elements, nature spirits and elemental beings, and you will discover that they are waiting patiently for us to work together for greater harmony and balance in the world.  Details of my 2020 workshops can be found on the Workshops page.

24 December 2019

 

This post is the first in a series.  The next will be on the topic of Working with the Elements, Nature Spirits and Elemental Beings.  How can we work together with the elements and the land to alleviate the impact of extreme weather?


In 2020 our introductory workshops will include modules on how to communicate with and support animals during natural disasters, such as these.  Our follow-on workshops will include how to work with the elements, nature spirits and elemental beings. For more details on these, please check our workshops page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Solstice meditation

The solstice is the perfect moment to sit quietly in nature and consciously release the last twelve months, and then set our intentions for the coming year.  I offer this meditation to support you with this process.  You may choose to record it onto a phone or other device, so that you can sit and listen to it with your eyes closed at your meditation place.  If you are in the Northern Hemisphere, there is a Winter Solstice meditation here.


“Close your eyes and become aware of your physical connection to the ground – through your feet or the log or bench you are sitting on. Imagine roots extending from your body down into the earth, growing and entwining with the roots of the trees and plants around you.

Turn your attention to your hearing – notice the sounds around you, the birds, the water, the wind, the closest ones and the farthest ones. Become aware of any physical sensations – the breeze or sun on your skin, the feel of the earth under your feet, the log or bench under your hands.

Now opening your eyes and using your ‘owl eyes’ become aware of your peripheral vision. Feel the immensity of this place, as it stretches out and connects through corridors of trees and hedgerows to the vast network of nature that spans the plant, and of which you are a part. Here you are – an aspect of nature, immersed for a while in your natural place in the rhythm of things.

Consciously connect with the fullness of midsummer, noticing how the energy around you is at its peak, the activities of the birds, insects and small creatures, the fullness of the trees and plants in their summer finery. Feel how all these beings are filled to bursting with life and energy. Take a moment to connect with the trees and plants and feel the vibrancy of life flowing through their cells. Visualise the same energy flowing through your veins, empowering and supporting you to bring your intentions into physical form.

Now close your eyes again and turn your thoughts to the last twelve months, bringing to mind the key points of the year. No need to remember everything – simply allow the moments to float into your memory, trusting that what you recall is what you need to recall at this time. Walk through your year in your mind’s eye in this way, month by month, giving thanks for each blessing, each new opportunity, each connection made (or lost), including giving thanks for the challenges of the year, as they too brought their teachings and opportunities to learn, grow and expand into the fullest expression of your essence self.

When you have ‘walked’ through the year, give thanks for it all and then release it.

Now turn your attention to the year to come. Imagine yourself doing those activities that you already know you will be taking part in, and see them happening in the best way. Next, bring to mind those things that you’d like the next twelve months to contain – specific activities and experiences, but also an overall sense of the relationships, connections, journeys and feelings that you would like the next year to contain. In this way you are setting your intentions for the year. You might want to imagine each of your wishes as a seed that you plant in the ground beside you, offering your wishes to the earth and to the nature all around you, where they will take root and grow. Each time you return to your sit spot you can water and feed these intentions.

Now give thanks (as if these things have already happened) and consciously release yourself from the meditative space, bringing your attention back to the current moment and place.”


In addition to the meditation you may wish to light a fire somewhere outdoors and use the fire to release your reflections and gifts from the last twelve months; and to offer up your wishes for the next twelve months.  To do this, simply write the reflections and intentions onto separate pieces of paper, and place them into the fire one at a time. This is a ritual that can be done with friends gathered around the fire together, bringing even more power to our intention-setting through the shared experience.  If you are doing it with friends, I find it works best to place all of your reflections on the last year into the fire one at a time, followed by then placing your intentions into the fire.

Whatever you do at this time of year I hope it brings you joy, nourishment and supports you on your journey.

With love,

Jacqueline xx

Winter Solstice meditation

The solstice is the perfect moment to sit quietly in nature and consciously release the last twelve months, and then set our intentions for the coming year.  I offer this meditation to support you with this process.  You may choose to record it onto a phone or other device, so that you can sit and listen to it with your eyes closed at your meditation place.  If you are in the Southern Hemisphere, there is a Summer Solstice meditation here.


“Close your eyes and become aware of your physical connection to the ground – through your feet or the log or bench you are sitting on. Imagine roots extending from your body down into the earth, growing and entwining with the roots of the trees and plants around you.

Turn your attention to your hearing – notice the sounds around you, the birds, the water, the wind, the closest ones and the farthest ones. Become aware of any physical sensations – the breeze or sun on your skin, the feel of the earth under your feet, the log or bench under your hands.

Now opening your eyes and using your ‘owl eyes’ become aware of your peripheral vision. Feel the immensity of this place, as it stretches out and connects through corridors of trees and hedgerows to the vast network of nature that spans the plant, and of which you are a part. Here you are – an aspect of nature, immersed for a while in your natural place in the rhythm of things.

Consciously connect with the silence and stillness of midwinter, noticing how the activity is slower and quieter now; that the beings living here are conserving their energy and building their reserves. Take a moment to connect with the trees and plants who have shed their leaves and drawn their energy down into the earth; resting, taking a pause. Visualise drawing your own energy inwards and down into your own roots, slowing your breath and becoming still, and feel how this supports you at this time of year.

Now close your eyes again and turn your thoughts to the last twelve months, bringing to mind the key points of the year. No need to remember everything – simply allow the moments to float into your memory, trusting that what you recall is what you need to recall at this time. Walk through your year in your mind’s eye in this way, month by month, giving thanks for each blessing, each new opportunity, each connection made (or lost), including giving thanks for the challenges of the year, as they too brought their teachings and opportunities to learn, grow and expand into the fullest expression of your essence self.

When you have ‘walked’ through the year, give thanks for it all and then release it.

Now turn your attention to the year to come. Imagine yourself doing those activities that you already know you will be taking part in, and see them happening in the best way. Next, bring to mind those things that you’d like the next twelve months to contain – specific activities and experiences, but also an overall sense of the relationships, connections, journeys and feelings that you would like the next year to contain. In this way you are setting your intentions for the year. You might want to imagine each of your wishes as a seed that you plant in the ground beside you, offering your wishes to the earth and to the nature all around you, where they will take root and grow. Each time you return to your sit spot you can water and feed these intentions.

Now give thanks (as if these things have already happened) and consciously release yourself from the meditative space, bringing your attention back to the current moment and place.”


In addition to the meditation you may wish to light a fire somewhere outdoors and use the fire to release your reflections and gifts from the last twelve months; and to offer up your wishes for the next twelve months.  To do this, simply write the reflections and intentions onto separate pieces of paper, and place them into the fire one at a time. This is a ritual that can be done with friends gathered around the fire together, bringing even more power to our intention-setting through the shared experience.  If you are doing it with friends, I find it works best to place all of your reflections on the last year into the fire one at a time, followed by then placing your intentions into the fire.

Whatever you do at this time of year I hope it brings you joy, nourishment and supports you on your journey.

With love,

Jacqueline xx

Communicating with Desert Lions

The lioness and I held one another’s gaze for long minutes.  I felt my heart expand and an overwhelming sense of appreciation flowed out of me towards her.  It felt as though there was nothing between us – no fear, no aggression, no wariness – only curiosity, acknowledgement and respect.

I had arrived in Namibia less than 24 hours earlier, and after a three hour journey came to this place – the Hoanib riverbed on the Skeleton Coast.  This is true wilderness, where the animals roam wild, unfenced and largely sheltered from human impact.  My colleague James and I were about to lead an Animal Communication safari, and we were on an evening drive to get our bearings.

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Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp

Two lionesses lay quietly in the shade and our guide stopped the vehicle 20 metres away.  I consciously quietened my mind, opened my heart and sent appreciation and love towards the older lioness.  I had no idea if she would respond, but that wasn’t the point – I simply hoped that she would feel respected and acknowledged for the amazing and powerful being that she is.  When she raised her head to look at me I could feel my excitement build. I deliberately calmed myself and continued sending her love and appreciation.  Everything fell silent and it felt as if we looked at one another for the longest time, but it was probably only a minute.  Then she laid her head on her paws and closed her eyes. My heart was filled to bursting with gratitude for the encounter.

At breakfast the next morning James said to me “that looked like quite a moment you had with that lioness yesterday.” I said I hadn’t realised he’d noticed, and he said, “I noticed because it was unusual behaviour from her”.  He explained that a wild animal would first and foremost be alert for potential danger, especially where humans are involved.  The vehicle in front of ours was full of people jostling for position with their cameras, and the driver of our vehicle had his window down and was talking loudly.  “She should have been distracted by both of those things, but instead she was looking at you.  It was unusual.”  Any doubt I had that the lioness and I had been in communication was dispelled by his observations.

Desert elephants waterhole
Desert-adapted elephants at waterhole

Two days later on an early morning drive our animal communication group had just tracked a herd of desert-adapted elephants to a waterhole when a message came through that the lionesses had been seen on the move, probably hunting.  We drove to where they had been seen and our driver began to look for tracks.  As we passed one of the huge sand dunes I felt a wave of emotion wash over me. It felt like immense sadness, and was coming from the direction of the dune.  I thought, “that’s odd, I wonder what that is” and made a mental note to see if it happened again.  We looped around, retracing our route, and this time we found the lion tracks – exactly where I’d felt the wave of emotion.  I began to wonder if there was a connection and remembered that my mentors, Anna Breytenbach and Jon Young, both talk of having a direct connection to a specific animal when they are tracking it. Anna describes it as a strong emotional connection, for Jon it is a ribbon of light.  I wondered if this could be what was happening to me.

Tracking lionesses
Following the lionesses’ tracks on foot a few days’ later

We followed the lion’s tracks for a while and then lost them in the dunes.  Once again the same sense of sadness washed over me, and I plucked up the courage to say “I feel they’re in that direction”, pointing to where the feeling was coming from.  The driver looked a bit uncertain, but after a while drove in the direction I’d pointed and sure enough he found the tracks again.  My confidence began to build as I started to trust that these feelings were really guiding me and that I wasn’t making this up.  Each time we lost the tracks, I would open myself to the emotional connection and guide the driver in that direction, and we would find the tracks again.

I also sent a silent message in words and images to the lioness, acknowledging that she was hunting and that we didn’t want to interfere, but asking respectfully if she would be happy for us to see her and her niece.  The feeling that came back was agreement “but we’re not stopping – you have to come and find us”.

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Ana trees in the Hoanib riverbed

Once more we lost the tracks and once more I pointed in a particular direction. Now our guide followed with less hesitation and suddenly one of our group saw the lions in the dry riverbed, walking slowly and purposefully up the bank and into the bushes on the other side.  Our guide followed at a respectful distance, taking a wide loop through the riverbed, bringing us ahead of them.  We waited in silence, and soon they emerged and walked no more than 10 metres away, disappearing again into the bushes to our left.

The driver looped around and moved on ahead, and a second time we watched in silence as they came past.  By now whole group was sending love and appreciation to these beautiful cats; no one had attempted to take a photograph, we were all awed by their presence and the connection we felt with them.  We also knew that taking a photograph carries with it ‘hunter’ energy, which wild animals are especially sensitive to, and that introducing this energy could dramatically change the dynamics – possibly causing them to avoid us.

Giraffe 2 cropped
Desert-adapted giraffe

I sent another message to the older lioness thanking her for letting us witness them in their hunt, and asking respectfully if she would be willing to pause briefly so that we could all see their full majesty.  When I make such a request, I do it with the understanding that the other being can say ‘no’ – it’s important that the request is made with respect and recognition of the other’s independence and self-determination, not with a sense of neediness or attachment, which can have the effect of pushing them away.

I got a sense of a slightly impatient ‘OK’, and as they emerged once more she paused – it was only a couple of beats, but she definitely stopped, and long enough for some of the group to take a photo.  The younger lioness stopped longer, looking around for a while before continuing.  With plenty of time to fully appreciate her beauty, we were privileged to witness her wild natural state from only a few metres’ distance.

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The two lionesses resting in the shade

Tears of gratitude rolled down my cheeks – I couldn’t quite believe that this most majestic and powerful of animals had heard me and responded.  I sent her a message of profound thanks and let her know that we would leave them to hunt in peace.  The driver noticed my tears and said “hay fever?” – I laughed and said, “no, I’m just very moved by these lionesses” – much later I’d tell them the fully story of what I’d just experienced.

Until this experience I would sometimes tell myself that I’m much better at teaching animal communication than I am at actually doing it.  This made me eat my words!  There is always more to learn and only “practise, practise, practise” will increase my proficiency, but as I tell others, the best way to build our confidence is to reinforce our positive experiences, and reaffirm over and over again that we are in telepathic communication with the other beings on Earth.

by Jacqueline Buckingham

Me and Nossi 1

 

for information about forthcoming opportunities to learn animal communication please visit the ‘workshops’ page